Super Familiar with The Wilsons

I Know Nothin'

March 29, 2021 The Wilsons Season 2 Episode 14
Super Familiar with The Wilsons
I Know Nothin'
Chapters
Super Familiar with The Wilsons
I Know Nothin'
Mar 29, 2021 Season 2 Episode 14
The Wilsons

We realize that we came somewhat ill-equipped into adulthood. Anyone else feel that way? SOOOOO  we determine to be the first parents in the universe to fully prepare our kids for the rigors of adulthood...starting NOW!

Enjoy...but it does get heavy.

Opening music "Wilson Suite"  by Josh Wilson.

All other music is by Andrew Wilson - Find him at electricsheap.bandcamp.com/music

Super Familiar with The Wilsons 

Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wilsonspodcast
on instagram at instagram.com/thewilsonspodcast
on twitter at https://twitter.com/wilsons_do
and on Youtube
Contact us! [email protected]

We are part of a network of Gainesville Podcasts...check it out and listen to more great content. The ImaGNVille Podcast Network: www.ImaGNVille.com

Show Notes Transcript

We realize that we came somewhat ill-equipped into adulthood. Anyone else feel that way? SOOOOO  we determine to be the first parents in the universe to fully prepare our kids for the rigors of adulthood...starting NOW!

Enjoy...but it does get heavy.

Opening music "Wilson Suite"  by Josh Wilson.

All other music is by Andrew Wilson - Find him at electricsheap.bandcamp.com/music

Super Familiar with The Wilsons 

Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wilsonspodcast
on instagram at instagram.com/thewilsonspodcast
on twitter at https://twitter.com/wilsons_do
and on Youtube
Contact us! [email protected]

We are part of a network of Gainesville Podcasts...check it out and listen to more great content. The ImaGNVille Podcast Network: www.ImaGNVille.com

Josh Wilson:

Hey Amanda.

Unknown:

Hey Josh.

Josh Wilson:

You know how long it took for me to realize that I don't know more than I know.

Amanda Wilson:

Let's go

Josh Wilson:

this is super familiar with the Wilsons. I'm Josh

Amanda Wilson:

I'm Amanda and today we are going to talk about things we wish we would have known

Josh Wilson:

oh wait wait wait my children I have reached for the lighter and I light the incense if you hear me gasping for air you will know that the incense like washed towards me and I don't know what did it whether I create air currents or or what

Amanda Wilson:

magical connection with your incense. But it does he position positions it so it blows straight into his face through the entire recording session. Okay,

Josh Wilson:

but I'm moving around in it and it it curses ever been in front of a campfire. And no matter where you move the fire smoke followed you. Yes, fire smoke. By the way. That's the thing. Just frickin Hurry up. I haven't even dug into my my bourbon here. So I don't know what the problem is.

Amanda Wilson:

So do you ever again talk about the things we wish we had known before we became a full fledged adults. I am a Pinterest user and not as much as I used to. I don't like the new Pinterest interface. But I get occasionally the you know, 75 things to teach your team before they leave home. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah list. And so it got me started thinking because we have children who are really spread out age wise, we've got one that's leaving for college in the fall, we've got one that's already out. And in college, we've got one that's going to be starting high school in the fall, and then one that will be starting pre kindergarten in the fall. So we got a chance to do it right with the last one if we and maybe possibly the middle one. If we start thinking about it now. So Josh, learn that bourbon hurts. I do you want to tell the people about the bourbon that you're drinking?

Josh Wilson:

No, but I'm going to Instagram a picture. This is a good way for us to get people to follow our socials, I will Instagram and tweet a picture of the bourbon bottle and you can just enjoy that

Amanda Wilson:

next. Okay. So it got me thinking and I started asking Josh, what do you wish you would have known. And so we're going to talk about that. But I've taken

Josh Wilson:

a slightly different slant. I mean, most of these things I wish I'd have known. But basically, these are things that I want to make sure to teach my kids before they, they get much older. So it's kind of the same thing. But some of these things. I knew most of them, I did it.

Amanda Wilson:

You know, I was thinking about it. And there's not a lot. And when I think about practical things, there's not a lot that I didn't know because I think you and I you know, you and I grew up in a time where we had a maybe just our family structures, we had to be a lot more independent than our children have to be. I was my oldest brother died of brain cancer when I was 11. And that began what was a really difficult period in my family, where my mom, rightfully so had very little left in her to, to give but she gave everything but you know, I just kind of picked up and started doing things for myself. And so I learned a lot of things. Before I went away, I knew how to balance a checkbook. I knew how to get car insurance, I knew how to pump gas, I knew I had to take my car in for an oil change. I didn't know how to do it myself. I didn't know how to change a tire but I didn't know how to call AAA. Mostly I had to call them for all the times I left my lights on, or my keys locked in my car, either with a dead battery or the keys in my car. So I was thinking the things that I wish I would have known. I wish I would have known how to cook more. I feel like I'm really getting into that now. At this age in my life, but I wish I would have. I liked baking. I think the only thing I knew how to make was Velveeta chicken nachos.

Josh Wilson:

I mean, that's a good place to start. Absolutely. I feel like that's the foundation. That's how Julia Child started. Really, Velveeta chicken.

Unknown:

Oh, you're such as

Amanda Wilson:

to Vinci. Nobody taught her how to cook, but she wanted to learn.

Josh Wilson:

Okay, well, that's your first thing. So my first thing that I didn't ever really learn how to do and I guess it's it's connected to a bunch of other social things. But kids today and yeah, I'm turning into that guy. Yeah. Teach them how to talk on the phone. Like I didn't really know how to talk on the phone. My dad wasn't the most sociable of people. And I hated answering the phone. I had major anxiety about the phone even back then the thing would ring and I would be could jump out of the room. So I never really learned how to talk on the phone. And to this day, I don't really enjoy you don't, I don't. And again, it's probably part of a larger dysfunction that I have. But learning to talk on the phone is important, because we're always going to have to do it. And yeah, I prefer to text. Those of you who are my friend know this, but it's really important to know how to converse with someone politely on the phone. My kids, my boys. I mean, when they answer the phone, you know, like I get it that you know who I am, because it comes up on your phone, but still suffer me a little bit more than a yo.

Amanda Wilson:

I think that might be just teenagers these days. And yes, I'm not that person. I as a teenage girl in the 90s had zero problem using the phone. So much so that I used it for a long amounts of time, my family my parents finally gave in and got call waiting. Remember call waiting?

Josh Wilson:

Oh, yes, yes, yes. But just another stressor. Like I'm on the phone. I'm dealing with that problem. And then there's this other one, I'm like, Oh, my God. It just got twice as worse.

Amanda Wilson:

No one would get me my own line. I really very much asked for my own line. They wouldn't do it. But they did give me a call waiting. And I remember one time I got in trouble because I started 69 something because I wanted to know if it was a boy that had called while I was gone.

Josh Wilson:

So many people have no frickin idea. Actually, that's not true. I've looked at our at our demographic, and we're squarely in the Star 69 generation. So go ahead.

Amanda Wilson:

Yes. I you know, one thing that I saw on one of all of these lists that I'm looking at, and it's something that my mom made me do, but was how to make an appointment. I had to call my dentist as a young child and make my dentist appointments or when I was checking out she'd help me make the appointments and I hated it. It may I had anxiety around doing it. But I'm glad that I did. I have no problem calling anyone and talking to them about anything now, making your own dentist appointment it to me is the equivalent of going outside and get the switch that I'm going to be know that also happened to me. I grew up in the south, but yeah, no.

Josh Wilson:

Alright, here's one, how to make eye contact, which again, I am terrible at making eye contact. But my children are worse. And so eye contact is important firm handshake. I guess that's not a thing that we do now. But it used to be important, but making those social connections. And actually I you know, again, grumpy old man here I worry about, about the effect that social media is having on people's ability to relate socially in person. But and that's one thing, but especially now that the pandemic has physically separated everyone, are we just gonna have a generation of people who don't interact physically,

Amanda Wilson:

I don't know, I it is a concern. And I've seen it on all the lists, how to make eye contact is on all of these lists. And guess what can't make eye contact when you're looking at your phone. So this is like what you're saying,

Josh Wilson:

You're you can't make eye contact because you're looking at the camera, the screen can't

Amanda Wilson:

well Also, I can't stop looking at myself when I zoom. And that is not me being arrogant, that is me worried that I'm doing something that looks dumb. That's just self preservation. I want to loop back to the cooking for a second. I think that I now as an adult and realizing that we lost my mom a lot earlier than we thought we would due to cognitive decline. I don't know how to make the things that she made that I like. And I don't know how to find those recipes. So that's something I wish I would have done or I wish that she would have done with me. Another thing that I wish that my

Josh Wilson:

cut in here for a second to say that you are an exceptional cook you've been especially the last two weeks or so maybe a little bit long you've been absolutely slaying it in the kitchen. It's been really really good.

Amanda Wilson:

Took me a year a year of quarantine. there but thank you.

Josh Wilson:

Also I'm supposed to be on a weight loss challenge at work well screw that I am gaining.

Amanda Wilson:

I am not cooking with carbs. No One No One is asking you to eat the carbs when I cook them.

Josh Wilson:

Alright, moving on. Okay, why did I bring that up?

Amanda Wilson:

I don't know. One thing I wish that my family would have taught me or they just would have been modeled for me was is in this might be tied up in my very conservative Christian upbringing. I wish that mental health would be would have been acknowledged and talked about. You know, my mom, I remember my mom, my dad taking my mom to the emergency room because they thought she was having a heart attack and she was having an anxiety attack. rightfully so she lost her first child, you know, and she had a really hard upbringing. She my dad didn't have a great marriage. There were a lot of things, but it was never talked about in in a bigger sense in the church. I think it was like you didn't talk about it. because it was a sign of weakness

Josh Wilson:

although it was an excuse it's like no no that's that's just an excuse you know god should be able to take care of it you

Amanda Wilson:

pray harder and it was really hard for me as an adult to finally start going to counseling finally start acknowledging that i have generalized anxiety yet but it's a chemical imbalance listen it took me a while to get used to to admit to taking my medication and so it's something that i think that we try really hard with our kids to make it very normalized to talk about mental health and and self care and asking for help when you need help and being able to have those hard conversations i'm proud of us i wish it would have been done differently for me

Josh Wilson:

yeah no forget about in my house no way so my next one is how to have polite conversation okay and really that that involves how to listen instead of figuring out what you're going to say and how to invest yourself in the life of another even if just for a moment and the you know the people some people say well they hate small talk well small talk isn't i mean there's such value in small talk because what you're doing is you're investing in that person and you're finding out about that person you're giving them space by asking simple questions to probably to possibly reveal profound things to you and so i think that that's so important again not a thing i ever learned well i grew up painfully shy and believe it or not anyway so i didn't have a conversation with folks that lasted more than three sentences but that's so so very important is is in being able to invest in other people being able to listen to other people

Amanda Wilson:

you are really good at that that is something that you really you're really good at it what making space for people to talk to you oh you were such a jackass again stop it my husband people know you are you're really good at that and it's something i've realized about you from the beginning that you you make space for people to you you engage with people in ways that make them feel like you want to know about them and i think that probably serves you well in your career as well you know i don't i i really feel like as far as life skills i kind of had everything down because i had to be i had to be independent or i was independent i got a job when i was right when i turned 16 i got my driver's license i got a car i got a job i went to school you know one thing i saw on one of these lists so i lived at home my freshman year in high school in college and then i moved out and i moved two hours out of town went to college and i went from going to a state university but with small classes to a state university with 800 people in a class and i just didn't go to class and so i was reading on one of these lists that said every time you skip a class like figure out what the monetary what that is like how much skipping a class cost you and you will be less likely to do it and that is a really good i think strategy so i can't think of things that other than just another thing that we strive to do here is just being very open with our kids that they can ask us anything we were asking them the other night what do you what do you wish that you knew and one of them very practically said i wish i knew about taxes or how to do my taxes and the other one said i wish i knew how to break a car window and i thought maybe she was on the life to crime but then i realized what she was saying is really self defense like how to kick out a taillight if you're being put in a trunk how not to be taken to a second location unfortunately these are things that women really kind of have to think about but self defense is a thing i was given a mace on a key chain but i didn't really know i probably made some stupid choices walking and night by myself not paying attention and so that's something that i really want our kids specifically the girl to have before they leave for college i'm frying today what is this

Josh Wilson:

i don't know okay well here's the thing that you're so accident prone i'm surprised you did not mace yourself several times

Amanda Wilson:

no it's because it wasn't a heat source

Josh Wilson:

oh that's what it is okay here's here's my next one how to apologize and mean it oh okay i'm i'm i've gotten good at apologizing because i've had plenty of practice but it was really difficult me for me growing up to admit that i was wrong part of it i was in a toxic environment where everything i did was wrong and so as a self defense mechanism i wouldn't admit that i was wrong but it's very important for you to be able to to honestly assess what you've done wrong to apologize for it and to mean it and then let let that be like cheese and then let that be that which is another thing that that i tend to not do is once i apologize is still beat myself up and that's not necessary either it's just you apologize Then you learn to move on very important.

Amanda Wilson:

Yeah, I think making mistakes and owning mistakes was hard for me as well. And I wonder how much of that we grew up very different households. But we grew up in a very similar conservative Christian environment. And I wonder how much that might have played into it. But I was having a conversation with the girl last night about wanting her to see me model, you know, saying that I made a mistake and that I don't you know, that I was wrong and that I don't have to live with whatever that mistake was. And I can, I can make changes and I want our kids to know that too. So I'm going to read you this quick little 25 life skills that I know we're used to have some things to share, but

Unknown:

I'm gonna jump in here. Are you out of your

Amanda Wilson:

I'm out of my list. So I'm switching to this but we'll we'll go back and forth. Are you gonna read 25? Yeah, no, I'm gonna. Okay, so the first one is make dinner. Could you make dinner when you moved out of house?

Josh Wilson:

Oh, no, absolutely not. Absolutely not. The, my, my go to dish when I moved out of the house was I would get it was what is the what's its Campbell's Soup that's got the red white label. Yeah. Okay. Campbell Soup had a chatter bean thing new. It's like a soup that you're supposed to add water to it. And so I would take that and I would pour more cheddar into it and put noodles into it. So it was like cheddar bean noodle casserole like a

Amanda Wilson:

pasta dish. Yeah, to bake it.

Josh Wilson:

I don't know what I was doing. But that was my go to for the longest and then of course, eggs. What do you still do very well, well, no, but I didn't used to do them all. I used to really suck at eggs. So now I now I love to cook. I love to cook. And it's the thing that I taught myself. My dad was a very good cook, but he didn't teach me how to do it. And so the I had to I had to do that one on my own before the internet. By the way,

Amanda Wilson:

I know. For a thing. I used to clip magazine, movie incense, I used to clip magazine recipes. So for a little bit of context, you grew up in a single parent household with just your dad and your dad was a really good cook. I grew up with my mom, my dad, but my mom was really great cook my dad did not cook. However, when my mom wasn't around. If she was traveling with her sister or something. My dad would make spam BBQ spam. That was his dish. So he just fry up some Pam spam and just some mean and some barbecue sauce on it. And that would be what he would have while I was making my better my better myself it Velveeta, Lord God bless it. Velveeta nachos moving on what what's something else you want our children to know?

Josh Wilson:

How not to talk?

Amanda Wilson:

I think one of them might have this down.

Josh Wilson:

Just not everything needs to comment. It's there's wisdom in choosing your words and choosing when you say your words. And I don't know that any of our children have that time actually the oldest one tends to to be a little bit more reserved.

Amanda Wilson:

That's the one I think has it down.

Josh Wilson:

Right. And it's the thing that I had to learn. It used to be that everything was a wisecrack. Everything was a sarcastic answer. And I made the mistake of doing that in front of someone once who just called me on it. And she she called me hard on it. And I was so embarrassed. And from that point on I've always, always measured my words now. I still say stupid things. Let's let's not kid and I still like to go for the joke. But not as much as I did. It's okay not to talk.

Amanda Wilson:

You know that my eye talking is a big thing and my family it's a big thing on my dad's side of the family. It's it's a running joke about how Milligan's can talk. And my brother one time paid me $20 to not speak from Lakeland to Charleston, South Carolina. So I mean, obviously, I talked a lot and I still talk a lot. But I do think that I've learned the value of just being quiet and being an active listener. I had something that went out of my mind, but now I'm watching you blow smoke around and I don't know, it's completely gone. Because I'm just watching you play with the smoke rings now. What's your next one? Because Next one

Josh Wilson:

is how to ask for help. Yep, still a thing that I struggle with? Yeah, it's very important. And part of it is is ditching a pride. Everyone needs help. That's that's a reality of life. Everyone needs someone else. A lot of people have problems admitting that. And that leads to a really bad thing sometimes. And so just ask for help. It's okay. It's gonna be all right. Ask for help. Yeah, that's

Amanda Wilson:

definitely one that I had to learn because I think that whether it was modeled to me or it's just something that I felt like I had to do, but I felt like I needed to be able to do everything on my own. I think what I was thinking about when you were talking about everything, being A joke another thing that I think is really hard for people to learn. And it's, I'm so proud when we finally start to see it is just letting a joke lie. Because that's something that it takes, you know, it's like if you want to be funny, and even the four year old loves it, when he makes people laugh, like, we like that we get fed with that, right. But just being able to throw a joke away and leave it is a herd skill for some adults. And so when we see it, occasionally, I get really proud of that.

Josh Wilson:

See, here's my thing. Now, I love to make myself I love to amuse myself, I love to make myself laugh. So I will throw something away. And if no one in the room gets it, I still get a charge out of it.

Amanda Wilson:

I think that's great that you actually just make yourself laugh. And that's enough for you. You don't need that validate validation from anybody. I mean, I need validation for other things, but just so happens that I just like to throw it out there.

Josh Wilson:

I've got two more, okay. Number one is the fact that it's okay to cry, and it's necessary and kind of tie that into how to grieve. I, I it's very recently I kind of came into the idea of becoming comfortable with with grieving now. I'm a crier, I cry it stupid movies and all this and that. And that's a thing that I've done for a long time. But learning to understand loss and understand the place that grief has in my life has been a lesson that that I really didn't learn until I started working with seniors, which is what I do now. And even now it's it's a struggle, because grieving is never easy. And I don't think it's ever anything that people have on lockdown. But I understand the necessity for it. And that it's a process that you have to go through you can you can't skirt it, you can't avoid it.

Amanda Wilson:

And it's a continual process.

Josh Wilson:

Well, because we're continually losing things. Wow, this is a heavy as hell,

Amanda Wilson:

right? I grieving is not I think one thing that I learned how to do and wish that I had known because of how bad things were early in my life. And then just it's continually I feel like I've had a life of loss. As opposed to a loss of life. I've had a life of loss, which is continually losing really close, important people. I can repress emotions very easily, and just, it's fine, we're fine, I'm fine. Let's watch this episode of friends and move on with her life. And that's something that eventually winds up backfiring. And the way that that came out when I was pregnant was that if you got me laughing so hard, I would just turn it would turn from laughing into sobbing and then I would just be sobbing for a really long time. And it's a really scary feeling because it still happens. And I guess I don't know why in it. I can feel it coming and you look at me and you go, you're not gonna cry, are you? And so it's like that, that that edge of being sane and the not.

Josh Wilson:

Okay, I wouldn't put it in in terms of saying or not. But just to tell you that for someone who enjoys making you laugh, it's like I'm living on the edge all the time. It's like I'm riding the motorcycle without a helmet. Alright, last one that I have is is I don't know what the proper way to say this. But it's a lesson that I learned a long time ago. And that's how to have people that you respect without idolizing them. Oh, yeah, I don't believe in heroes. I don't think there's any such thing as a hero. I don't believe in heroes. And I've had people that I have put up on a high pedestal who have not fallen off, jumped off. And it's just taught me that that what I think is a realistic view of humanity, which is we are all flawed, flawed, we all make mistakes. And that's just a reality of life. And also we are capable of doing great and amazing things. Both of those are true both of those live within each one of us. And that's just reality. So there's no need to put people up on pedestals. They don't belong there. There's also no need to be totally cynical about life and to be totally negative about everyone. Everyone has good everyone has not so good and that's life.

Amanda Wilson:

Yeah, I mean I yeah, I mean, I definitely had that experience as well. So let's let's quickly go through this this list to see if you had these 17 basic life skills before you moved out of the house.

Unknown:

This is a quiz. No no, no, no, no we did Dennis's in game time.

Amanda Wilson:

This is not game I do have a game we haven't

Josh Wilson:

had game I haven't no we don't have enough time in this episode. But we haven't had game time in a whole Okay, well so

Amanda Wilson:

alright wash dishes. Did you know how before he left the house,

Josh Wilson:

is there how to wash dishes. You put them in the machine. You turn it on? Boom done next.

Amanda Wilson:

Do your own laundry.

Josh Wilson:

See what I just said?

Amanda Wilson:

So button.

Josh Wilson:

Know what those buttons you buy? You buy new clothes.

Amanda Wilson:

iron a shirt.

Josh Wilson:

Yeah. I knew how To do that often I would do that in lieu of washing my clothes sometimes how to

Amanda Wilson:

keep a plant or an animal alive.

Josh Wilson:

Okay, so here's the thing that leads into my my wreck. So we do recommendations everywhere and so I'm just gonna go ahead and do my recommendation. Now I recommend houseplants. I don't know if we've talked about this on the podcast or not. But I am cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs and houseplants Yes. I love like we've decked out our house and houseplants but something occurred to me that that kind of goes along with that. People who get houseplants who are parents must be really cocky parents. I can keep my children live plus these that don't even need me to keep them like no one asked me to keep these things alive. I volunteered.

Amanda Wilson:

Did you know how to unclog a drain? I didn't you do now. But I yeah, you want to talk about your little adventure and unclogging a drain?

Josh Wilson:

Well, I love Amazon and I love using Amazon to solve problems. I learned that from my friend Josh at work. We had the four year old flush that bar that holds your toilet paper onto the toilet paper holder he flushed that down the toilet

Amanda Wilson:

and no one knows why.

Josh Wilson:

Well there doesn't have to be a why he's four. There's no why. So I had to go get it while I couldn't reach it. And so I went and I bought like a little snake first I bought a snake and the snake couldn't do anything because it was kind of wedged in there. Didn't know where it was wedged so then I I bought like a laparoscopic camera. He did meet me den and a snake that had little little claws on the end. And that's how I ended up I have not so now I have I owned this this camera. I am available for drains for non invasive surgery. I've got all the things ready because I have my implement. It's got

Amanda Wilson:

a grabby claw snake and a laparoscopic camera. Good. Alright, change the tire. Yeah, we've covered that easy. Call AAA jumpstart a

Unknown:

car No,

Josh Wilson:

change the tires easy

Amanda Wilson:

again called AAA.

Josh Wilson:

I've done I've jumped started so many cars, how to

Amanda Wilson:

read a map, not GPS. I know how to read a map.

Josh Wilson:

I mean, we could absolutely have an entire podcast about life skills that are no longer necessary.

Amanda Wilson:

Like write a check, which is the next one

Josh Wilson:

write a check reading a map, dialing a phone

Amanda Wilson:

conversation, scheduling an appointment because you do it online now. Yep. Uh, all right. Well, those are how to be on time. I'm still learning that one. How to say no and stand up for themselves.

Josh Wilson:

How to say no, Did I not say that? Because that was on my list. I guess I skipped it. How to say nose is so important. And that kind of is goes hand in hand on how you deal with conflict and how you deal with the idea of disappointing people. If you're a people pleaser. It's a very dangerous thing to be because it can get you in lots of trouble. So it's important to be able to say no. And you know what your no can just be no, you don't have to give an excuse or reason. You want to go out with me tonight? No, no, I don't. And then that can be that. Unless of course it's you and then the answer is always Oh, yes dear.

Amanda Wilson:

Yeah, better always be Yes, dear. Did you know well. I did not know how to parallel park until I was an adult. This list says Don't worry about mastering parallel parking because they're designing cars that will do that for you. So just put that into our thing. And I like this one. It's okay to outgrow your dreams. So it's okay to change the person that you were when you were growing up to the person that you are now.

Josh Wilson:

I've outgrown my drawers but that's a different problem.

Amanda Wilson:

I think that's mostly just quarantine. Okay, we will wrap up but I would like to share something that our good friend Ashley from the offbeat mom cast posted the other day on her social it's a quote by someone t Ri paldi. When we adults think of children there's a simple truth which we ignore childhood is not preparation for life. Childhood is life. A child isn't getting ready to live a child is living. The child is constantly confronted with the nagging question, what are you going to be courageous would be the youngster who looking the adult squarely in the face would say I'm not going to be anything I already am. So this this butts up against what we've been talking about what we want to teach our kids as we prepare them for life. They're already living and so I think it's that that given that take we're teaching them how to grow up and be successful adults, but I think they are teaching us how to be in the moment and that's, that's my wreck. So just try to find space. I am I'm living in chaos and not finding a whole lot of calm but try to find space, even if it's just two minutes sitting outside with a cup of coffee, watching your little one giggle but try to find some space for some calm

Josh Wilson:

Alright, Right. That's good. I appreciate that. We are super familiar with the Wilsons. That'll do us for this week.

Amanda Wilson:

right in, check out our socials on twitter at Wilson's underscore do or Instagram or Facebook and let us know what you wish you would have known or what you are really certain you're going to teach your kids before they leave the house.

Josh Wilson:

Yes, very good. We are part of a network of podcast based in Gainesville, Florida called imagine Ville. And so I'm going to give you the web address and you can go check out our friends. It's imagine bill spells. I am a G and V. I ll e.com. Imagine film. The Opening Music was by me It's called the Wilson suite. The Closing Music is by Andrew Wilson and I don't remember what it's called. But you can check him out. Look on the show notes and you'll see his website there. He's an excellent musician. I aspire to be as good as him and also He's my son. Alright you all we will talk at you next week. Until next week, be good to each other.

Amanda Wilson:

Bye.

Josh Wilson:

Yo